Menu & Reservation

Things to do in San Antonio Texas

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry’s standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book.

It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages

Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center

Business – 0.5 milles

The facility is the central component of the city’s successful convention industry. The Center, named for the late US congressman Henry Barbosa González, hosts more than 300 events each year with over 750,000 convention delegates from around the world.

River Walk

Nature Activities – South – 0.1 mile

Cobblestone walkways lead visitors to the river-level restaurants and shops. The river bubbles to the surface on the grounds of the University of the Incarnate Word and flows to downtown, threading its way through the city one level below the hustle and bustle of city streets. First called Yanaguana by the Payaya Indians, meaning “place of refreshing waters.” Along the horseshoe shaped riverbend, the river is shaded by towering cypresses, oaks and willows and bordered by gardens of flowering ornamental plants.

The riverwalk
River cruisers travel the River Walk’s three miles past unique retail shops, restaurants and nightclubs. http://www.thesanantonioriverwalk.com

San Antonio Missions National Historical Park

Representing both church and state, these missions were charged with converting the local Native Americans, collectively called Coahuiltecans, into devout Catholics and productive members of Spanish society. More than just churches on the Spanish Colonial frontier, the missions also served as vocational and educational centers, economic enterprises involved in agricultural and ranching endeavors and regional trade.

http://www.nps.gov/saan

The Majestic

Theatres – South – 3 miles

Located at 224 E. Houston Street in the heart of downtown San Antonio, the Majestic was designed and built in 1929 by John Eberson for Karl Hoblitzelle’s Interstate Theatres, and stood proudly for many years as the largest theatre in Texas and the second largest motion picture theatre in the country. It was intended to be the most modern and ornate building in South Texas – complete with new sound and projection equipment – and was the first theatre in the state to betotally air-conditioned.

http://www.majesticempire.com

La Villita

State Parks – South – 0.1 mile

It was originally a settlement of primitive huts for the Spanish soldiers stationed at the Mission San Antonio Valero (the Alamo). This beautifully landscaped historic district offers leisurely shopping, dining and five rental venues for special events.
Shops open daily 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Free admission.
Closed holidays.

http://www.lavillita.com

San Antonio ZOO

Nature Activities – North – 5 miles

In 1914, Colonel George W. Brackenridge, one of the city’s leading citizens and founder of the San Antonio Express-News, placed buffalo, elk, deer, monkeys, a pair of lions, and four bears on land he had deeded over to the city in what is now known as Brackenridge Park. This collection became the San Antonio Zoo. Much about the San Antonio Zoo has changed since Colonel Brackenridge assembled his collection of animals in 1914. Today, the San Antonio Zoo is home to more than 3,800 animals representing 750 species.

http://www.sazoo-aq.org

Casa Navarro State Historic Site

State Parks – South – 3 miles

The site, is the restored home of Tejano patriot José Antonio Navarro. Today, visitors tour Navarro’s adobe home furnished with period antiques, read copies of his writing and discuss questions of history with informed park interpreters.

Casa Navarro is open Wednesday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The site is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays.

http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/

Buckhorn Museum

Museums – South – 2 miles

Discover more than 120 years of history…. Texas style. Marvel at two stories of the most exotic collections you’ve ever seen, from our unique horn collection, to cowboy memorabilia and fish from the Seven Seas. See a two headed calf and a lamb with eight legs! Test your hand in our authentic shooting gallery and arcade. Don’t miss the world’s only Wax Museum of Texas History. And, don’t forget to swing by the Buckhorn Curio Store, where you’ll find extraordinary Texas collectibles and authentic Buckhorn souvenirs for the entire family. Located a short two blocks from the Alamo and 50 feet from the River Walk.

The Witte Museum

Museums – North – 5 miles

Located in Brackenridge Park, on the banks of the San Antonio River, the Witte offers permanent exhibits that include dinosaur skeletons, cave drawings, wildlife dioramas, and even some live animals. Several historic homes have been reconstructed on the campus, which also features the very popular H-E-B Science Treehouse. Changing galleries include Texas artists, textiles and showcase exhibits, some locally produced and some traveling national exhibits.

Sea World

Nature Activities – South – 9 miles

SeaWorld San Antonio is located at the intersection of Ellison Drive and Westover Hills Boulevard, just off State Highway 151 between Loop 410 and Loop 1604, 16 miles northwest of downtown San Antonio. Numerous directional signs are visible from Highway 151. SeaWorld San Antonio 10500 SeaWorld Drive San Antonio, TX 78251. It’s actually four parks in one on 250 acres: a show park, a rides and slides park, a water park and an amazing animals park.

At SeaWorld San Antonio, there’s something for everyone!.

Market Square

Business – East – 0.5 mile

Here in the romantic center of the Mexican Culture, discover a land of treasures, bright, bold and beautiful. Market Square… authentically Mexico and enriched with a fascinating legacy of public markets.

http://www.sanantonio.gov/dtops/marketsquare

The Alamo

Museums – North – 0.3 mile
Although the Alamo fell in the earlymorning hours of March 6, 1836, the death of the Alamo Defenders has come to symbolize courage and sacrifice for the cause of Liberty. The memories of James Bowie, David Crockett, and William B. Travis are as powerful today as when the Texan Army under Sam Houston shouted “Remember the Alamo!” as it routed Santa Anna at the battle of San Jacinto on April 21, 1836. The Alamo has been managed by the Daughters of the Republic of Texas since 1905. Located on Alamo Plaza in downtown San Antonio, Texas, the Alamo represents nearly 300 years of history.